Valuing the Family Business

Valuing the Family BusinessNortheastern University

Family Business Quarterly
by Chris M. Mellen, ASA

Paul Phoenix, successful owner of Phoenix Electronics, Inc., sees the potential for growth in his company, but needs additional funds to finance that growth. He currently holds a 75% interest in Phoenix, with his brother owning the remaining 25%. Paul has given consideration to gifting some shares to his children, as well as to establishing an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP). However, he has been approached by several interested investors to buy equity in Phoenix Electronics. Banks have also expressed a willingness to loan him additional capital. As a result, his advisers have suggested that a formal appraisal of the business would be needed to address all these situations. More…

Family Limited Partnerships: An Overview

Family Limited Partnerships:
An Overview
EntrepreNews

FLP terms are very flexible, and can be changed or terminated by the general partners, as opposed to irrevocable trusts which require heavy litigation to amend.

In a family business, the company’s financial challenges can also become the family’s financial challenges.When a business owner dies, the family inherits all his/her assets, including the highly valued (hence heavily taxed) company. All too frequently we hear of a family that has sold off the company to pay crippling estate taxes.

Fortunately, financial estate planners have come up with an effective strategy to counter this problem: the Family Limited Partnership (“FLP”).Although this structure has some technical complexities, the concept is very simple.This article illustrates some of the benefits of this strategy so that you can make informed decisions about the future of your business and your family’s financial well-being. More…