Plan Now for the “Cousin Generation”

UMassby John Ward

For a year, speakers have come to the Family Business Center to say, in one way or another, that a family business thrives when family business members put business concerns ahead of family issues.

But John Ward has other ideas. In order for a business to thrive, he believes, it must incorporate the values and operating structure of the family. “The real issues are family-based issues more than business-based issues. The family is the most important place to focus our attention.”

As an example, Ward, author of Keeping the Family Business Healthy and other books, family business columnist for Nation’s Business, and Professor of Private Enterprise at Loyola University in Chicago described a scenario of a business that has several expansion choices. It could add new product lines within its current geographic territory, buy out a competitor in a foreign country, or develop new market penetration by opening up locations on its own in different parts of the country. More…

The Key Issues that Can Help Family Businesses Gain Control of Sibling Rivalries

The Key Issues that Can Help Family Businesses Northeastern University
Gain Control of Sibling Rivalries

Family Business Quarterly
by Thomas Davidow and Richard Narva

Old soldiers, General Douglas MacArthur once remarked, “don’t die, they just fade away.”

Not so sibling rivalries. They have been around since the beginning of mankind–related most memorably in the biblical narratives of Cain and Abel and that of Joseph, his brothers, and the coat of many colors. And they can create nearly as much havoc in today’s family businesses as they did in the biblical tales. Some family businesses have been literally torn apart by the intensity of feelings created when one sibling feels neglected or rejected,