Business Continuity is the Prize of Succession (Part I)

Baylor
Legacies Newsletter
by Ernesto J. Poza

Three brothers run a retail chain catering to a well-defined market niche. The business is people intensive, and customer service is very important. Competition is fierce in their industry. As a rule, profit margins are low. New products and product/service combinations do offer opportunities for healthier profit margins. The brothers have grown the business four-fold in their twenty years of leadership and are now preparing for the transition to a third generation of owner-managers.

The next generation is better educated and has worked outside the family business in well-regarded Fortune 500 companies. Motivation to professionalize the firm, update its managerial practices and ramp-up the growth curve is high. The third generation is ready to use organizational and human resource systems to support increased teamwork, delegation with accountability as well as a more strategic approach to the business’ market niche.

The family is now larger. Each of the brothers has three children, expanding the potential pool of successors to nine. To prune the owning family tree, the brothers entered into a buy-sell agreement funded by life insurance. It specifically states that next generation family members need to be full-time employee/managers to qualify for ownership. This is, briefly, the business and family context in which succession is presently taking place in many family-owned businesses. More…

One Answer to a Family Business Owner’s Wish to Treat His Children Equally

One Answer to a Family Business Owner’s
Wish to Treat His Children Equally
Northeastern University

Family Business Quarterly
by Joseph F. Blum

How does a parent who owns a successful family business treat all his children “equally” when only some are working in the business?

In our age of career and family mobility, this question represents an increasingly common dilemma facing owners of family companies as they try to do estate planning. It raises a host of financial and emotional issues for both the older and younger generation. For example, how can children who aren’t working in the family business be granted equal portions of an estate that consists primarily of the business without alienating the children who are working in the business?

Absent resolution, these and other such questions can lead to feelings of resentment in both generations. Complete equality in such situations, as in much of life, is nearly impossible to achieve. But increasingly, those of us who work with family business estate matters are developing approaches that create feelings of equality so that everyone involved feels satisfied with the outcome. More…